Caring For Your Jewellery

Made with love and attention, the same meticulous selection process we follow for selecting diamonds and crafting perfect settings goes into all our jewellery. From necklaces and bracelets to earrings and cufflinks, each of our pieces is designed to stand the test of time, and provide lasting memories for years to come.

Proud of our reputation for exceptional quality and exacting standards, our passion for jewellery and diamonds is at the heart of why we adore what we do. With professional expertise in every store, we can share our knowledge and expert training to ensure your jewellery always looks its best. And for our Beaverbrooks diamonds, we will provide a lifetime of free cleaning, care and advice, because we believe your diamonds should look nothing less than stunning every day.

General Tips

Jewellery Box

To keep your beautiful jewellery looking its best, we recommend that you always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products, and that you remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery.

You should remove your jewellery before doing any housework or manual labour, and gems and pearls should be handled as little as possible to prevent the natural oils in your skin making them dull.

Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled, and special care should be taken with pearls as they are very soft and delicate and can be scratched very easily.

Cleaning products for your jewellery:

We stock a range of non-abrasive cleaning products for gold and silver, as well as professional jewellery cleaning cloths which will ensure your beautiful jewellery dazzles every single day.

Jewellery Cleaner

Gold Jewellery Polishing Cloth

£7.99

View
Jewellery Cleaner

Silver Jewellery Polishing Cloth

£7.99

View
Jewellery Cleaner

Jewellery Sonic Cleaner

£27.00

View

View all cleaning products

About Gold, White Gold & Rose Gold

Gold

We have been adorning ourselves with gold jewellery from as early as 2600BC, its brilliance, natural beauty and lustre giving it universal appeal. Once believed to be formed from a combination of water and sunlight, gold is as old as the earth itself and is rare, precious and a timeless symbol of love, success and luxury.

Gold is a natural beautiful yellow colour which does not rust, tarnish or corrode, and whose reflective qualities make it bright, shiny and eye-catching. Rarely used to create jewellery in its pure state, gold is commonly mixed with metal alloys in order to maximise its strength and wearability. Altering the alloy to gold ratio will create a different fineness of the final gold product, which is referred to as its carat weight. At Beaverbrooks we stock both 9ct gold (which has a fineness of 375, meaning it is made up of 375 parts per 1000 of pure gold), and 18ct gold (which has a fineness of 750, meaning it is made up of 750 parts per 1000 of pure gold).

White gold and rose gold are both alloys of yellow gold. Rose gold is created by mixing pure yellow gold with copper to create a rose, pink or red colour, whilst white gold is created by mixing pure yellow gold with white metals such as silver and palladium. In order to give white gold its bright white appearance, the finished piece of jewellery is then coated with rhodium. This is a precious metal from the platinum family which is very hard and has a bright white lustre which doesn’t tarnish.

To keep your gold jewellery looking fantastic:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery.
  • Remove your jewellery before doing any housework, gardening or manual labour.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • You can also use a specialist gold cleaner, as long as it is non-abrasive. Our Jewellery Cleaner for Gold Items is gentle and non-abrasive, and comes with a soft bristled brush as well as a jewellery cleaning cloth.

Top tip: Over time the rhodium coating on your white gold will wear away, revealing the champagne coloured gold beneath. Whilst this in no way detracts from the beauty and value of your white gold jewellery, it’s easy to have it re-rhodium coated to keep it looking like new. We offer all of our customers one free re-coating if any of your white gold jewellery needs to be re-rhodium coated within 12 months of purchase.

Did you know: The most malleable and ductile of all precious metals, gold is soft and easy to shape. Its ductility enables just one ounce of gold to be drawn out into a wire a mile long and the thickness of a human hair.

About Platinum

Platinum

Often described as pure, rare and eternal, platinum is billions of years old. Platinum's beautiful white lustre will never tarnish, fade or change colour and is the perfect setting to show off our beautiful Beaverbrooks diamonds at their sparkling and brilliant best. The ultimate symbol of luxury, all of our Beaverbrooks platinum jewellery is 95% pure.

35 times rarer than gold, platinum is heavy, strong and will not wear away, making it the perfect setting for holding stones securely.

To keep your platinum jewellery looking fantastic:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can cause permanent damage.
  • Remove your jewellery before doing any housework, gardening or manual labour.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Our Jewellery Cleaning Cloth is perfect for bringing out the shine and lustre of your platinum jewellery.

Did you know: if all the platinum ever mined was poured into an Olympic sized swimming pool it would barely cover your ankles. That’s exclusive with a capital E.

Top Tip: Over time the surface of your platinum jewellery will develop what is known as a patina of wear, which is considered by many to be unique and desirable attribute. However, if you prefer, we can arrange to have your platinum jewellery polished to bring it back to its original shine without any loss of metal.

About Pearls

Pearl

A symbol of immense power and wealth during Roman times, the ancient Greeks associated pearls with love, marriage and unrivalled beauty, whilst during the Dark Ages, knights wore pearl tokens on the battlefield to protect them from harm.

The only gemstone to be formed by a living creature, each pearl is unique and requires no faceting or polishing to reveal its beauty. Pearls can be formed by most oysters and freshwater mussels, and are created when a foreign body enters the oyster. The oyster will then defend itself by laying down layers of calcium carbonate, or nacre, around the intruder, which will eventually result in the pearl being formed. These thin layers of calcium carbonate are what create the pearl’s lustre, which is caused by light reflecting and refracting through the upper layers of nacre. A pearl that has a high lustre will almost appear to be lit from within, whilst a pearl with poor lustre will seem chalky in comparison.

Today, only 1% of the pearls on the high street are what is known as natural pearls, which are pearls that have formed by chance in a wild oyster. The remainder are described as cultured pearls.

Cultured pearls are created by oysters and mussels in the same way as natural pearls, except the pearl is formed around a seed, typically a bead of mother of pearl shell with a piece of donor mantle tissue, which is implanted by the pearl farmer. The oyster or mussel still does all the work in creating the lustre, colour and surface quality of the pearl and is solely responsible for the beauty and unique structure of each pearl. Cultured pearls can be sub-divided into saltwater and freshwater pearls. Saltwater pearls are produced in oysters in the ocean, whereas freshwater pearls are cultivated in mussels which are farmed in lakes and rivers.

Although pearls are sometimes dyed to produce a specific colour, normally the colour of each pearl will depend upon the individual oyster or mussel, as well as its type. For example, Tahitian oysters produce black, blue or green pearls, whereas the South Sea oyster will produce white, silver, pink, grey or golden pearls. To match pearls for a necklace or bracelet, it will often be necessary to search though hundreds, if not thousands of pearls to find those that look perfect together.

How to care for your pearl jewellery

  • Pearls are a delicate, natural substance and have a low resistance to heat and chemicals. They are particularly vulnerable to attacks by acidic products which will make their surface appear dull.
  • Always spray your perfume and apply make-up a few minutes before putting on your pearls. Both will damage the skin of your pearls, and will cling to the silk used to string them.
  • Chemical cleaners should never be used on pearls, it is best to wipe them occasionally with a clean soft cloth or cotton wool and a little cool water, before drying them carefully.
  • You should inspect the stringing of your pearls every six months or so to check for any fraying. If you wear your pearl necklace regularly, it is best to have it re-strung every year, and even if worn in-frequently it will help to have them re-strung every couple of years to ensure they look their best. Just ask in any of our stores who will be happy to advise you.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your jewellery.

Top tip: As pearls are classed as soft stones and are easily scratched, it is best to store them in a soft pouch away from your other jewellery, especially heavy gold pieces or stone set pieces that might damage the nacre.

Did you know: once believed to be the tears of gods, wearing pearl jewellery is a centuries old tradition and during the Renaissance, pearls were so highly treasured that several European countries passed laws which forbid anyone outside of the nobility from wearing them.

About Sterling Silver

Silver

The most reflective of precious metals, this bright white metal has been used for ornaments and utensils for over 5000 years. Considered by ancient Egyptians to be more precious than gold, the earliest silver mines date back to 4000 BC, and it is found primarily today in Mexico and Peru.

Slightly harder than gold, it is malleable, ductile and pliable, making it perfect for creating jewellery as it can be beaten into thin sheets of leaf or pulled to make strong wires. Like gold, silver is alloyed in order to make it harder and more suitable for use in jewellery. All of our Beaverbrooks jewellery is sterling silver. This is the standard most often used for jewellery. It is 92.5% pure silver, and is commonly alloyed with copper to give it strength, as well as to preserve its ductility and high shine

To keep your sterling silver jewellery looking fantastic:

  • All silver jewellery will tarnish over time. We recommend that the best way to keep it looking great is to enjoy wearing it often
  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products
  • Remove your jewellery before doing any housework, gardening or manual labour
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Use our Jewellery Cleaner for Silver Items. A gentle and non-abrasive polish specially formulated to care for your sterling silver jewellery, it comes with a soft bristled brush and a lint-free polishing cloth
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your jewellery.

Top Tip: some items of jewellery may have a blackened silver effect applied to them in order to make details of the jewellery stand out and to create an edgy character. You should be careful when cleaning these items, and should not use a silver polishing cloth or specialised silver cleaning products as the blackened effect may be removed.

Did you know: Silver’s unique sensitivity to light is what made photography possible. The first photographs were produced in the early 1800’s using paper or white leather treated with a solution of silver nitrate. Approximately 1/3 of the silver produced worldwide is used in photography.

About Palladium

Palladium

Palladium is part of the platinum family, and is a precious metal with a natural bright white colour which won’t tarnish. It has a low density, making it light and easy to wear, and its natural white lustre is perfect for showing off the dazzling sparkle and fire of our diamonds.

24 times rarer than gold and only found in a few remote locations, palladium was discovered as a precious metal over 200 years ago, but has only recently been used by jewellery designers. This makes it a very modern and contemporary alternative to white gold and platinum, and is harder and more durable than silver.

To keep your palladium jewellery looking fantastic:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can cause permanent damage
  • Remove your jewellery before doing any housework, gardening or manual labour
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Our Jewellery Cleaning Cloth soft and lint-free, and is perfect for bringing out the shine and lustre of your palladium jewellery

Top tip: Like platinum, palladium will develop a patina over time. We can easily re-polish your rings if you would like to return them to their original finish.

Did you know: the word ‘palladium’ means a guardian or a charm to protect or preserve. For this reason, palladium rings are thought to be good luck for a lasting marriage. Palladium was named after the goddess Athena, who was renamed Pallas Athena after she defeated a giant who tried to capture Mount Olympus. She then had a sculpture built in her honour to protect the city from attack.

About Titanium

Titanium

A natural metal which has a lustrous silvery grey colour, Titanium was originally discovered in Cornwall in 1791, although its use in jewellery is very recent. Creating a modern and fashionable image, titanium is extremely strong, durable and light, and has a high resistance to tarnishing and corrosion.

As strong as steel, and almost twice as strong as aluminium, titanium is very resistant to denting which makes it particularly suitable for wedding rings and watches, its high-tech and modern appeal making it particularly popular with prestigious watch brands such as TAG Heuer, Omega and Breitling.

To keep your titanium jewellery looking fantastic:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume and hair products
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can cause permanent damage
  • Remove your jewellery before doing any housework, gardening or manual labour
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Our Jewellery Cleaning Cloth soft and lint-free, and is perfect for bringing out the shine and lustre of your titanium jewellery

Top tip: titanium is a very strong metal which cannot be soldered, meaning that it will not be possible to re-size your titanium rings now or in the future. You should bear this in mind when choosing your ring to ensure you get the correct fit.

Did you know: used in the production of high-end racing cars and motorcycles where reducing weight but maintaining strength is important, the McLaren F1 supercar even has a titanium toolbox, as it is 50% lighter than a corresponding steel kit.

About Diamonds

Diamonds

Here at Beaverbrooks, we’ve been hand selecting diamonds for almost 100 years, meticulously examining 100,000’s of stones in our tireless search for only the most beautiful diamonds.

The beauty, magic and rarity of each and every diamond are at the heart of why we adore what we do. Proud of our reputation for exceptional quality and exacting standards, our passion for diamonds has been nothing short of a love affair.

The pure wonder of diamonds is brought to light through their formation. Your diamond has been millions of years in the making, and each one is as unique as a snowflake meaning there will never be another diamond like yours anywhere in the world.

To read more about how we choose our beautiful Beaverbrooks diamonds, read our Diamond Buying Guide.

To keep your Beaverbrooks diamonds looking dazzling:

  • Always put your diamonds on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your diamond as this can leave a thin layer of oil which can make your diamond appear dull.
  • Remove your diamond jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery.
  • Don’t wear your diamonds to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Although diamonds are very hard, they can be cracked or chipped if they suffer hard impacts.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • We recommend that you bring your diamond jewellery back to us to be professionally cleaned at least once a year. This will give our team of expert colleagues an opportunity to check your precious jewellery for damage that you might not notice. We will provide a lifetime of cleaning, care and advice for your Beaverbrooks diamond jewellery because we believe it should look nothing less than perfect every single day.

Top tip: to ensure your diamond ring is always dazzling, leave it in a cup of mild soapy water next to your bed overnight. In the morning, scrub your ring gently with a soft brush before rinsing it well and patting dry with a soft lint-free cloth.

Did you know: in 2004, astronomers discovered a star located 50 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The centre of this star is an enormous diamond, which is approximately 4,000 km wide and is estimated to weigh 10 billion trillion trillion carats (a 1 with 34 zeros after it).

Gemstones

Garnet

Birthstone for January

Garnet

Celebrating a long association with jewellery, a beautiful red garnet bead necklace found in an Egyptian tomb dates back more than 5000 years. One of the most common and widespread of gems, they are found in almost any colour, including fiery red pryope, vibrant orange spessartine and rare intense green varieties of grossular and andradite.

Associated with purity, truth, faithfulness and friendship, garnets were prized possessions of Egypt’s pharaohs, and finely carved garnets were used to stamp wax seals by the ancient Romans. Exhibiting few inclusions, red garnets in the almandine, pryope and rhodolite group typically do not have any eye-visible inclusions, whilst the rare green demantoid crystals might have horsetail inclusions which can actually increase their value.

How to care for your garnet jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your garnet as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Garnet can also be damaged by hydrofluoric acid.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Garnets are durable enough for use in jewellery, but should be protected from hard knocks and rough wear.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Cleaning in an ultrasonic cleaner is usually safe, but steam cleaning should be avoided.

Top tip: Garnets may rarely be fracture filled, in this case only warm soapy water should be used to clean them.

Did you know: In Kashmir in 1892, the Hunzas used garnet bullets to fight the British, believing that garnet bullets were deadlier than lead.

Amethyst

Birthstone for February

Amethyst

Part of the quartz family, purple amethyst has been treasured through the ages due to its striking colour, and was called a “Gem of Fire” in ancient times as well as being associated with St Valentine and faithful love. Amethyst is believed to both stimulate and soothe the mind and emotions, and carries the energy of fire and passion, creativity and spirituality.

A dichrotic stone, which means that it will show a bluish or reddish purple tinge when viewed from different angles, amethyst can display characteristic inclusions which look like tiger-stripes, thumb-prints or feathers. Very popular in the late 19th century, amethyst jewellery can have a fantastic vintage inspired style, and is usually faceted as a mixed- or step-cut.

How to care for your amethyst jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your amethyst as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Amethyst can also be damaged by hydrofluoric acid, ammonium fluoride, and alkaline solutions.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Amethyst is a fairly hard gemstone but care must be taken to prevent it from being scratched, chipped or cracked.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • You should take care with extreme temperatures, as abrupt changes in temperature can cause your amethyst to crack. Therefore steam cleaning is not recommended.
  • Some amethyst colour can fade with prolonged exposure to intense light.

Top tip: Always fasten the clasp of your amethyst necklace or bracelet to prevent the pendant being lost. Necklaces can be placed in lengths of tissue paper which can then be folded to prevent the chain from becoming tangled.

Did you know: Derived from the Greek work ametusthos, meaning ‘not intoxicated’, throughout history the special virtue of amethyst has been that of preventing drunkenness and over-indulgence. Ancient Greeks and Romans routinely studded their goblets with amethyst, believing that wine drunk from an amethyst cup was powerless to intoxicate.

Aquamarine

Birthstone for March

Aquamarine

Part of the beryl group of minerals along with emerald, aquamarine is an exceptionally hard gemstone with an outstanding glass-like lustre. Famous for its beautiful sea-blue colours which can range from sky-blue to dark blue, the name aquamarine is derived from a Latin expression which means ‘sea water’.

Particularly suited to rectangular or square cuts, the most favoured cut for aquamarine is the emerald step-cut which emphasises its colouration. It is common practice for aquamarines to be heat-treated in order to enhance their colour, but care must be taken not to overheat the stones as they may become colourless.

How to care for your aquamarine jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your aquamarine as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Aquamarine can also be damaged by hydrofluoric acid.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Aquamarine is a very hard gemstone but care must be taken to protect it from hard knocks and from scratches.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • You should take care not to expose your aquamarine to extreme heat.
  • Cleaning with ultrasonic and steam cleaners is usually safe, unless the stone has liquid inclusions or fractures.

Top tip: Aquamarine looks best set in white gold or sterling silver as the bright white finish shows off the stone's cool, blue colour perfectly

Did you know: According to mythology, aquamarine originated in the treasure chests of mermaids, and since ancient times has been regarded as a lucky stone for sailors.

Diamond

Birthstone for April

Diamonds

Here at Beaverbrooks, we’ve been hand selecting diamonds for almost 100 years, meticulously examining 100,000’s of stones in our tireless search for only the most beautiful diamonds.

The beauty, magic and rarity of each and every diamond are at the heart of why we adore what we do. Proud of our reputation for exceptional quality and exacting standards, our passion for diamonds has been nothing short of a love affair.

The pure wonder of diamonds is brought to light through their formation. Your diamond has been millions of years in the making, and each one is as unique as a snowflake meaning there will not be another diamond like yours anywhere in the world.

To read more about how we choose our beautiful Beaverbrooks diamonds, read our Diamond Buying Guide.

To keep your Beaverbrooks diamonds looking dazzling:

  • Always put your diamonds on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your diamond as this can leave a thin layer of oil which can make your diamond appear dull.
  • Remove your diamond jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery.
  • Don’t wear your diamonds to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Although diamonds are very hard, they can be cracked or chipped if they suffer hard impacts.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • We recommend that you bring your diamond jewellery back to us to be professionally cleaned at least once a year. This will give our team of expert colleagues an opportunity to check your precious jewellery for damage that you might not notice. We will provide a lifetime of cleaning, care and advice for your Beaverbrooks diamond jewellery because we believe it should look nothing less than perfect every single day.

Top tip: To ensure your diamond ring is always dazzling, leave it in a cup of mild soapy water next to your bed overnight. In the morning, scrub your ring gently with a soft brush before rinsing it well and patting dry with a soft lint-free cloth.

Did you know: In 2004, astronomers discovered a star located 50 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The centre of this star is an enormous diamond, which is approximately 4,000 km wide and is estimated to weigh 10 billion trillion trillion carats (a 1 with 34 zeros after it).

Emerald

Birthstone for May

Emerald

A gemstone from the beryl family, the finest emeralds are a gorgeous, clear rich green. Treasured for over 4000 years, emeralds were originally sourced from Cleopatra’s mines in Egypt, and are so rare that a fine emerald can be more valuable than a high quality diamond of the same carat weight.

Rarely flawless, the presence of fissures and inclusions is very common, and so stones are often oiled in order to fill and disguise cracks, as well as to hide flaws and enhance their colour. Although emeralds are fairly hard stones, they are brittle and sensitive to heat and pressure and are traditionally cut in a step-cut (emerald cut) which shows them off at their most brilliant best.

How to care for your emerald jewellery

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your emerald as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Light and chemicals can cause the oils used to fill surface-reaching fractures to alter in appearance or deteriorate.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Emerald is a hard gemstone but can be scratched and damaged by hard knocks, and will require more care in wearing than ruby, sapphire or diamond.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash your emerald in a mild solution of soap and tepid water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Heat can damage emeralds, especially by extending existing fractures.
  • We recommend that you bring your emerald jewellery back to us to be professionally cleaned at least once a year. This will give our team of expert colleagues an opportunity to check your precious jewellery for damage that you might not notice. We can also advise you about having your emeralds re-oiled if necessary.

Top tip: Cleaning your emerald jewellery with ultrasonic and steam cleaners should be avoided as it can weaken any fractures or cause the oil to sweat out of the stone

Did you know: Emerald is the traditional gift for a 55th wedding anniversary

Pearl

Birthstone for June

Pearl

The only gemstone to be formed by a living creature, each pearl is unique and requires no faceting or polishing to reveal its beauty. A symbol of immense power and wealth during Roman times, the ancient Greeks associated pearls with love, marriage and unrivalled beauty, whilst during the Dark Ages, knights wore pearl tokens on the battlefield to protect them from harm.

Pearls can be formed by most oysters and freshwater mussels, and are created when a foreign body enters the oyster. The oyster will then defend itself by laying down layers of calcium carbonate, or nacre, around the intruder, which will eventually result in the pearl being formed. These thin layers of calcium carbonate are what create the pearl’s lustre, which is caused by light reflecting and refracting through the upper layers of nacre. A pearl that has a high lustre will almost appear to be lit from within, whilst a pearl with poor lustre will seem chalky in comparison.

How to care for your pearl jewellery

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your pearls as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Pearls are very soft and delicate and can be damaged by heat, chemicals and even perspiration.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Pearls are classed as soft stones and can be scratched and cracked easily.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • Pearls can be cleaned occasionally in warm, soapy water. If your pearls are strung, you should make sure that the string is completely dry before wearing them again. For routine care it’s best to wipe cultured pearls with a very soft, clean cloth after each time you wear them.
  • Never clean your pearls in an ultrasonic or steam cleaner.

Top tip: Imitation pearls are smooth when rubbed against your teeth, whilst natural or cultured pearls have a slightly rough texture.

Did you know: In 1917, Pierre Cartier traded a double strand of natural pearls for his mansion on Fifth Avenue in New York City.

Ruby

Birthstone for July

Ruby

One of the best gemstones for jewellery settings, rubies may be any shade of red and are second only to diamonds in hardness. In ancient times, India was considered to be the classical source of rubies, and in the Sanskrit language, ruby is called rantnaraj, which is translated to King of Gemstones. The birthstone for those born in July, ruby is traditionally given to celebrate a 40th wedding anniversary and has been thought since the Middle Ages to protect its wearer against misfortune and bad health.

Part of the corundum family along with sapphires, the finest gems come from Burma, but are also mined in Thailand, India, Australia and Norway. Rarely found without imperfections, all natural rubies will display colour impurities or inclusions of rutile needles which is known as silk. Normally heat treated in order to deepen their colour and improve their clarity, rubies are hard and resilient gemstones, making them a perfect stone to use in rings and other mountings subject to daily wear.

How to care for your ruby jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your ruby as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Ruby is very stable under normal wearing conditions, but acidic solutions should be avoided.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Although ruby demonstrates excellent durability, it can still be scratched and its mounting may be damaged.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Ultrasonic and steam cleaners are normally safe, but should not be used for fracture-filled or dyed stones.

Top tip: As rubies are often worn with diamond rings, make sure they are not rubbing together as the diamond will scratch your ruby

Did you know: In ancient times, rubies were kept under the foundations of buildings in order to strengthen its structure

Peridot

Birthstone for August

Peridot

Associated with light, this beautiful yellow-green gem was known by the Egyptians as the ‘gem of the sun’, and is thought to have especially protective powers when set in gold. Cut in a variety of styles for use in jewellery, some peridot is 4.5 billion years old and is found in pallasite meteorites, remnants of our solar system’s birth.

Demonstrating an extremely high double refraction, peridot’s colour is intrinsically yellow-green, rather than caused by impurities like many other gemstones. Pure green stones are very rare, the gem’s colour tending to be finest in stones weighing 10 carats and above.

How to care for your peridot jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your peridot as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Peridot can be damaged by sulphuric acid, and can also be attacked over a long period of time by acid perspiration.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Peridot is suitable for normal jewellery wear but you should take care not to scratch it, or subject it to hard blows that can cause it to fracture.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Rapid changes in temperature or uneven heating can cause peridot to fracture, and so ultrasonic and steam cleaners are not recommended.

Top tip: Known as the ‘evening emerald’, your peridot’s colour will shine even more vividly in candlelight and artificial light, making it perfect for a special night out.

Did you know: Peridot crystals have been found in meteorites, and some of these rare extraterrestrial crystals are even big enough to facet as cut gemstones.

Sapphire

Birthstone for September

Sapphire

Traditionally thought to symbolise nobility, truth, sincerity and faithfulness, sapphires have decorated the robes of royalty and clergymen for centuries. Throughout history, sapphires have been worn to symbolise heaven, to protect their owners from envy and harm, and were re-enforced as a gem associated with royalty and romance when Prince Charles gave Lady Diana Spencer a blue sapphire and diamond engagement ring in 1981.

The most valuable shade of sapphire is a clear, deep blue, but they can occur in many shades including pink, orange, yellow, green, purple and black. Normally heat treated in order to deepen their colour and improve their clarity, sapphires are hard and resilient gemstones, making them a perfect stone to use in rings and other mountings subject to daily wear.

How to care for your sapphire jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your sapphire as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Sapphire is very stable under normal wearing conditions, but acidic solutions should be avoided.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Although sapphire demonstrates excellent durability, it can still be scratched and its mounting may be damaged.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Ultrasonic and steam cleaners are normally safe, but should not be used for fracture-filled or dyed stones.

Top tip: As sapphires are often worn with diamond rings, make sure they are not rubbing together as the diamond will scratch your sapphire

Did you know: The birthstone of September and the traditional gift for a 45th wedding anniversary, sapphires are part of the corundum family and are found in Burma, Sri Lanka and India

Opal

Birthstone for October

Opal

Predominantly found in Australia, several types of opal occur in nature, although there are two main varieties – precious opal and common opal or potch. A hardened silica gel, usually containing 5-10% water, the opal’s appearance can range from colourless, white, and light grey through to dark grey and black. Opal’s unique characteristic is that it displays all the colours of the spectrum, resulting from the interference and diffraction of light passing through tiny silica spheres in the microstructure of the stone, which appear to move and change dramatically depending on the angle at which it is viewed. Common opal and potch does not display this play-of-colour.

Believed by ancient Romans to be a combination of the beauty of all precious stones, they ranked second only to emeralds, and were carried as a special talisman because it was believed that, like a rainbow, it brought the wearer good luck. For thousands of years, opals have been considered a token of hope and purity, and have also been referred to as ‘the Cupid stone’ because it suggested the clear complexion of the god of love.

How to care for your opal jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your opal as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Opals should be kept away from caustic cleaning products.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Opal is suitable for jewellery but is fairly soft (equivalent to glass), and can be scratched.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Never clean your opal in an ultrasonic cleaner, as the intense vibrations may cause cracking.
  • As most precious opals contain approximately 5-6% water, they may crack if subjected to very dry conditions or rapid changes in temperature. Try to avoid very high temperatures or low humidity extremes, such as boiling water.

Top tip: If you need to store your opal away for a long period of time, place your opal in cotton wool with a few drops of water, then into a sealed plastic bag. This will prevent water coming out of the stone if it is exposed to very low humidity environments

Did you know: In 2008, NASA announced the discovery of opal deposits on Mars. As opals have a high water content it may suggest that the surface of Mars was wet for billions of years. It is also a particularly intriguing discovery as, on Earth, opals have often preserved fossils and other signs of biology.

Citrine

Birthstone for November

Citrine

A yellow or golden yellow variety of quartz, the name citrine is derived from the word ‘citrus’. Gem quality citrine is extremely rare, and most citrine found on the market is actually heat-treated amethyst. Almost always faceted for use in jewellery, the most popular cuts are round brilliants and ovals as these cuts tend to maximise their colour.

Thought to radiate positive energy, citrine has been known as ‘the success stone’ and is believed to promote prosperity and abundance. Taking its yellow colouration from the presence of iron, citrine has been used to imitate topaz and was once called Brazilian topaz.

How to care for your citrine jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your citrine stone as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Citrine can also be damaged by hydrofluoric acid, ammonium fluoride, and alkaline solutions.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Citrine is a fairly hard gemstone but care must be taken to prevent it from being scratched, chipped or cracked.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • You should take care with extreme temperatures, as abrupt changes in temperature can cause your citrine to crack. Therefore steam cleaning is not recommended.

Top tip: Citrine’s sunny yellow colour makes it a great alternative to yellow diamonds, and looks great set in white gold or silver.

Did you know: Believed to generate income for the person holding the crystal, businesses have been known to keep a citrine stone in their cash registers to help them acquire wealth.

Topaz

Birthstone for December

Topaz

Occurring in a range of different colours, pure topaz is colourless with impurities causing the variation in colour, of which deep golden yellow topaz (sometimes called sherry topaz) and pink topaz are the most valuable. Blue and green topaz is also sought after, whilst blue topaz may also be produced by heat-treating pure colourless stones. Exhibiting high clarity with few inclusions, topaz is highly prized for its brilliance and vitreous (glassy) lustre.

Used in jewellery since Ancient Egyptian times, it is believed to be beneficial to artists, writers, public speakers and others who are concerned with self-expression. Both the Egyptians and the Romans associated topaz with the Sun God, and the ancient Greeks believed that topaz was such a powerful stone that it could increase the strength of the wearer and even provide invisibility in desperate times.

How to care for your topaz jewellery:

  • Always put your jewellery on after applying make-up, perfume, hair products and body lotions, and avoid touching your topaz as this can leave a thin layer of oil on the surface which can make it appear dull.
  • Remove your jewellery before showering or swimming as soap can leave a film on the surface and chlorine can permanently damage or discolour your gold jewellery. Topaz is generally resistant to chemicals, but can be damaged by sudden temperature changes.
  • Don’t wear your jewellery to do any housework, gardening or manual labour. Topaz is a fairly hard stone, but can be scratched and must be protected from hard knocks.
  • Individual pieces of jewellery should be wrapped in tissue or cloth, or placed in separate compartments in a jewellery box to prevent them becoming scratched or tangled.
  • To keep it looking dazzling, wash it in a mild solution of soap and water using a very soft bristled brush. Rinse it well with cool, clean water and then dry it using a soft, lint-free cloth.
  • Never clean your topaz jewellery in an ultrasonic cleaner, as the intense vibrations may cause cracking.

Top tip: Topaz has one perfect cleavage, meaning that a hard blow might split it, and extreme pressure or sharp temperature changes might cause it to break. For this reason it is very important to avoid steam or ultrasound when cleaning your topaz jewellery

Did you know: The ‘El-Dorado Topaz’ is the largest faceted gemstone in the world, weighing a staggering 31,000ct (6.2kg). Discovered in 1984 in Brazil, the original rough stone weighed 37kg, meaning that the equivalent of 83% of the original stone was lost in the cutting process

Call free on 0800 169 2329

We're here Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm